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Pardo d’oro: “La Fille de nulle part”

Pardo d’oro: “La Fille de nulle part”

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© Xavier Lambours/ Signatures

Pardo d’oro: “La Fille de nulle part”

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Pardo d’oro: “La Fille de nulle part”

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Pardo d’oro: “La Fille de nulle part”

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Pardo d’oro: “La Fille de nulle part”

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Pardo d’oro
La Fille de nulle part by Jean-Claude Brisseau, France

With this new film, it looks like you wanted to go back to the roots, towards a low budget cinema which does not give up the courage of experimentation.
I started again to shoot films with a small budget because I had the clear sensation that big productions could obstruct artistic freedom. So I decided to regain it, because I am convinced that it is possible to transmit emotions also with modest means at disposal. Afterwards, I can just say that I did not expect the film could be presented in a Festival. Being awarded such a prestigious prize is really a big surprise.

Your movie is able to mark theoretical, moral and aesthetical reflections without never stopping focusing on emotions...
I have never liked to underline my intentions about the core of my films. Neither the technical, nor the narrative and philosophical ones. I wanted to mix elements exactly like I did with the few people I worked with on the set. After all, I was interested in keeping that intimacy and transmitting it to the audience.

The intimacy, which marks the encounter between the man and the woman in the film, is haunted by ghosts, a surprising incursion to paranormal.
I tried to find the right mix between daily life objects and a fantastic world that progressively comes into the film, but without transforming it into a fantasy work tout court.

La Fille de nulle part wants to maintain a balance between philosophical cues, comical or (at least) poetical moments like the ones which have a connection with the arts. But I repeat, I was interested in the mix between different elements.

Elements that (maybe) find a common point in the reflections on life’s illusions?
This is of course one of the main themes of the film, as demonstrated by the main character (the old math professor) who is busy writing a book about life’s illusions that imprisoned him, from politics to religion to daily life, because after all – as happens in some film scenes – when illusions fall, it is possible to come to craziness or to dramatic results.

And, as it ofthen happens in your filmography, on the one hand there is a taste for romanesque while on the other hand there is an autobiographical mark, even if it is developed and hidden by the mise en scène.
I can just write about things correlated to my personal life, then I mix them with imaginary elements. I wanted to reach a vast and simple audience, not only the élite. Making something difficult to put on a scene, but trying to hide this difficulty at the same time.

Lorenzo Buccella
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